Temporary Travel Office

STORE

FEATURED PUBLICATION

Stories in Reserve is our answer to the Lonely Planet series of guide books.
We currently have Volume One—a full-color, 36 page book + 3 audio CDs featuring three audio tours of the territory known as North America.

Reader/listeners will be taken on some unexpected journeys:

Ricardo Miranda Zúñiga guides us into Tijuana and finds one example of transnational commerce in a rather unexpected place—a dentist's chair.

Sarah Kanouse takes us to a Superfund- classified National Wildlife Refuge in Southern Illinois.

Ryan Griffis, Lize Mogel & Sarah Ross walk us around Vancouver's False Creek, the site of two global mega-events.

The book can be ordered for $10 + the cost of shipping ($5USD in the US, $15USD for international shipments) to help fund future volumes. Donations are accepted by PayPal. For other arrangements, please email us.

Go to the Stories in Reserve site to find this and future versions in other formats.

OTHER ITEMS FOR SALE

  • Parking Public Guide to Wrigleyville, Chicago

    PARKING PUBLIC GUIDE TO CHICAGO'S WRIGLEYVILLE NEIGHBORHOOD

    Parking Public Guide for Chicago's Wrigleyville neighborhood. This small booklet was produced as a supplement to a walking tour conducted in 2010.

    + ORDER THE BOOK

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  • Parking Public Guide to Wrigleyville, Chicago

    PARKING PUBLIC GUIDE TO HOLLYWOOD

    This small booklet was produced as a supplement to a walking tour conducted in 207 and 2008.

    + ORDER THE BOOK

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  • Parking Public Guide to Wrigleyville, Chicago

    PARKING PUBLIC DVD

    Our Parking Public Video is a 13 minute video essay that gives an abbreviated history of parking lots in the US.

    + ORDER THE DVD

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  • Invasive Irrigation Kit

    INVASIVE IRRIGATION KITS

    This kit contains seeds of the plant, Brassica juncea com- monly referred to as Indian Mustard, as its known origins are Central Asia. Currently, it is distributed across most of the globe, including the entire United States, where it is con- sidered a noxious weed. It is most commonly found in disturbed areas - along highways, train tracks, vacant lots and various “waste” areas.
    Young tender leaves of mustard greens are used in salads or mixed with other salad greens. Older leaves with stems may be eaten fresh, canned or frozen, for potherbs, and to a limited extent in salads. Mustard greens are often cooked with ham or salt pork, and may be used in soups and stews. Although widely and extensively grown as a vegetable, it is being grown more for its seeds which yield an essential oil and condiment. Easier to grow than Black Mustard (B. nigra), it has nearly replaced it in brown mustard preparations since 1945. Mustard Oil is one of the major edible oils in India, the fixed oil content of rai varying between 28.6% and 45.7%. Oil is also used for hair oil, lubricants and, in Russia, as a substitute for olive oil. Adding 1.1–2.2% mustard oil to fresh apple cider retards fermentation. Seed residue is used as cattle feed and in fertilizers. It is high is vitamins A and C and Iron, providing an adult with 60% of his recommended daily Vitamin A requirement, all the Vitamin C requirement and about one-fifth the iron.
    Directions for use:
    1. Acquire a plastic container with a lid (milk jugs work great)
    2 . Remove any labels
    3. Attach an “invasive” and “native” labels to the container (or add your own message with labels or a sharpie)
    4. fill with water and close
    5. take to desired public site
    6. poke several small holes in bottom of container
    7. plant mustard seeds within one foot radius of container.

    Shipping